Human Research Ethics Committee

AH&MRC Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) Membership:

The HREC membership is determined by the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research (2007, updated 2018). Due to the specialist nature of the AH&MRC HREC, further positions have been developed to support comprehensive cultural review of research proposals submitted to this HREC. The members of the AH&MRC HREC are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

How does the AH&MRC HREC review applications?

The AH&MRC HREC reviews research in accordance with the following documents:

  1. The National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research (2007 updated 2018)
  2. Ethical conduct in research with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and communities: Guidelines for researchers and stakeholders
  3. Keeping Research on Track II

All members must undergo an induction at which time copies of the above guidelines are provided. Additionally, training is provided to the HREC members throughout their term of appointment.

What are Members expected to do?

  • Uphold the values of the AH&MRC and act with integrity at all times
  • Continually develop their knowledge and skills base around national and state ethical guidelines and policies
  • Attend meetings every six weeks
  • Review approximately two or three applications prior to the HREC meeting and provide your comments at the meeting for discussion
  • Be involved in the review of amendments relating to projects which you have reviewed in full.

Types of Membership

Chairperson

A Chairperson with suitable experience whose other responsibilities will not impair the HREC’s capacity to carry out its obligations under this National Statement.

Lay Member

At least two lay people, one man and one woman, who have no affiliation with the institution and do not currently engage in medical, scientific, legal or academic work.

Professional Care

At least one person with knowledge of, and current experience in, the professional care, counselling or treatment of people; for example, a nurse or allied health professional.

Aboriginal Elder

At least two people, one man and one woman, who perform a pastoral care role in a community, for example, an Aboriginal elder, a minister of religion.

 

Legal Representative

At least one lawyer, where possible one who is not engaged to advise the institution.

Researcher

At least two people with current research experience that is relevant to research proposals to be considered at the meetings they attend.

Aboriginal Medical Service Representative

An employee or Board of Directors member of an Aboriginal Medical Service from each of the four NSW Regions  (Northern, Southern, Western and Eastern).

Youth Representative

A person aged between 18-25 years of age that is an active community member with an interest in health research.

To register your interest for one of the above membership categories click the ‘Register Now’ button below.

Register Now

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